2021 ACT National States Composite Report Card Grade and Science Benchmark Results

The Composite Report Card Grades are the average grade for the Nation, each state, and the District of Columbia.

The minimum College Readiness ACT Benchmark in Science is a report card grade equivalent to a 64.

The Afterclap Strongly cautions against comparing states or the national results to state results because the percentage of students taking the ACT varies widely between state to state and would not be an apples-to-apples comparison.  

 StateComposite Report Card GradePercent Meeting or Exceeding the Science Benchmark Grade of 64 or Better
Alabama5223
Alaska5738
Arizona5532
Arkansas5326
California7268
Colorado6456
Connecticut7676
Delaware7168
District of Columbia7166
Florida5735
Georgia6348
Hawaii5123
Idaho6451
Illinois7065
Indiana6452
Iowa6044
Kansas5532
Kentucky5326
Louisiana5123
Maine7169
Maryland7165
Massachusetts7779
Michigan7065
Minnesota6045
Mississippi5019
Missouri5736
Montana5736
National5635
Nebraska5635
Nevada4920
New Hampshire7471
New Jersey7062
New Mexico5837
New York7373
North Carolina5327
North Dakota5432
Ohio5431
Oklahoma5529
Oregon5738
Pennsylvania6964
Rhode Island7267
South Carolina5226
South Dakota6045
Tennessee5328
Texas5634
Utah5737
Vermont6766
Virginia7167
Washington6655
West Virginia5836
Wisconsin5636
Wyoming5532

Recent post:

Don’t know much about Sam Cooke’s Wonderful World A Self Evaluation

You can find The Afterclap online:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

LINKS and ATTRIBUTIONS:

ACT Average ACT Scores by State Graduating Class of 2021 https://www.act.org/content/dam/act/unsecured/documents/2021/2021-Average-ACT-Scores-by-State.pdf

Don’t know much about: Sam Cooke’s Wonderful World

A Self Evaluation

How close to the reality of our daily lives did Sam Cooke’s song, Wonderful World, come?

At The Afterclap, we consider it common to desire someone to love and be loved in return. But what about the rest of the song.

While the song Wonderful World was primarily composed by Lou Adler and Herb Alpert, Cooke revised the lyrics to include more education references. And when looking at the first two verses, ask yourself:

How much of those subjects did you learn during your birth through high school graduation years?

And how much have you forgotten?

Verse 1:

Don’t know much about history
Don’t know much biology
Don’t know much about a science book
Don’t know much about the French I took

Verse 2:

Don’t know much about geography
Don’t know much trigonometry
Don’t know much about algebra
Don’t know what a slide rule is for

While not everyone took French, a foreign language, or used a slide rule: how much do you still remember if you did?

Because we are amid a pandemic, we have been asking ourselves these self-evaluative questions at The Afterclap. And not for the first time. In part because we are all about education. And as a result, we have been busy studying and translating the measurements of Science knowledge. And from the published data, our consensus so far:

As a nation, not enough of us learned or remembered what was in our science books.

Watch and listen to the song:

Sam Cooke – What A Wonderful World (Official Lyric Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4GLAKEjU4w

You can find The Afterclap online:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

LINKS and ATTRIBUTIONS:

Sam Cooke – Wikipedia (January 22, 1931 – December 11, 1964)

https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sam_Cooke

Song: Wonderful World

Artist: Sam Cooke

Writers: Lou Adler, Herb Alpert, Sam Cooke

Release Date: April 14, 1960, by Keen Records

Lyrics: Sam Cooke https://genius.com/Sam-cooke-wonderful-world-lyrics

2021 SAT Henry County Schools Understandable Results

2021 SAT results as released is intentionally laid camouflage, of technically correct misinformation, generally understood only by Psychometricians. The Afterclap is metaphorically like a lifeguard to rescue you from the collateral damage misinformation undertow.

The Afterclap’s work is unconventional, unorthodox, and controversial. Unorthodox because our audience is the public, not academics and psychometricians. Unconventional because the translations are easily understood. Unorthodox because the translations are self-explanatory based on the publics’ personal experience in school. And Controversial because the mathematical translations show a significant disconnect between education authorities’ explanations and a “Report Card Grade.” As to the math formulae, it is as old as ancient Rome.

President Ronald Reagan used the Russian proverb, “Doveryai, no proveryai” [ do-ve-RYAI NO pro-ve-RYAI ] “trust, but verify” while in office. The Afterclap, unlike public, private, or government education authorities, encourages you to “doveryai, no proveryai.”

At The Afterclap, we do not compare different cohorts. We hold this comparison to be an “academic fallacy” perpetrated on the public. And we have this position, not because we know everything about each cohort. We hold this position because we know that beyond apparent similarities, each cohort is alien to each other academically, socially, and scientifically down to their collective DNA., and insufficient data is collected to make any comparison.

Henry County Schools, District, and Georgia’s Composite Report Card Grades:

Dutchtown                   53

Eagle’s Landing          54

Hampton                      48

Locust Grove               52

Luella                             51

McDonough                46

Ola                                  57

Stockbridge                 49

Union Grove               58

Woodland                    50

School System            52

State                               56

We could have separated the results into ERW and Mathematics, but the results would not improve.

You can find The Afterclap online:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

Source: Henry County Press Release # 0013-09-2021

2019 Twelfth Grade NAEP Science Report

Almost two years past the Cohort Class of 2019 arrived at Terminus Station in their Birth through High School Graduation Journey. As potential life-long-Learners, data shows the Class of 2019 was left behind, unprepared, and inadequately learned. Yet they were forced out of their Factory-model, Assembly line, Age-group promotion, Schools.

The last part of this report shows the cumulative effect of Parent-education levels on student learning.  If you have read the Eighth-Grade results, this will not be new. Otherwise, this may be the first time you have seen the Parent impact on learning.

The results you will see here are different from the classic misdirection released through the Media by “The U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)” to the public. The Afterclap uses a proprietary Mathematical Formula and Process, “Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score.

The process produces two essential products:

1. The percent of points earned.

2. The equivalent Classroom Grade.

The math is not complicated. However, students are expected to master this level of math before leaving the Eighth-Grade.

Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score is vital because, in Education and Communication, the Sender must start where the Receiver’s level of knowledge is. Otherwise, all the Receiver hears or sees is misdirection or misinformation because they do not understand it. At The Afterclap, we believe a super-majority of the adults in the United States understands percent and classroom grades ranging from zero to a perfect score of one-hundred.

To convert a Percent of a Perfect Score to a classroom grade, drop the percent sign and round to the nearest whole number.  All average scores found within this post are classroom equivalent grades.

All students.

The average Science grade was 50.

In the tenth percentile, 34.

In the ninetieth percentile, 66.

40.64 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

37.14 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

20.40 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

1.82 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

By Gender:

Male Students

The average Science grade was 51.

In the tenth percentile, 33.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

39.29 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

35.75 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

22.55 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

2.41 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Female Students

The average Science grade was 49.

In the tenth percentile, 33.

In the ninetieth percentile, 64.

42.00 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

38.54 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

18.22 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

1.23 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

National School Lunch Program Eligibility, Three Categories:

Eligible Students.

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 30.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

56.61 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

33.14 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

9.86 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.39 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students Not Eligible.

The average Science grade was 53.

In the tenth percentile, 37.

In the ninetieth percentile, 68.

29.69 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

39.66 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

27.78 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

2.88 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Student Information Not Available.

The average Science grade was 52.

In the tenth percentile, 36.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

31.82 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

41.19 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

25.01 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

1.98 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Race and Ethnicity Using 2011 Guidelines, School-reported:

Students identified as White.

The average Science grade was 54.

In the tenth percentile, 39.

In the ninetieth percentile, 68.

27.86 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

41.82 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

27.81 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

2.51 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students identified as Black.

The average Science grade was 42.

In the tenth percentile, 27.

In the ninetieth percentile, 57.

68.56 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

25.32 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

5.94 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.17 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students identified as Hispanic.

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 30.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

55.55 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

34.66 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

9.42 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.37 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students identified as Asian.

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 37.

In the ninetieth percentile, 71.

26.53 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

32.99 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

34.66 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

5.81 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students identified as American Indian and Alaska Native.

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 33.

In the ninetieth percentile, 62.

51.43 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

35.57 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

11.83 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

1.17 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Students identified as Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander.

The average Science grade was 46.

In the tenth percentile, 31.

In the ninetieth percentile, 62.

58.22 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

27.90 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

13.20 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.69 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.                             

Students identified as Two or More Races.

The average Science grade was 526.

In the tenth percentile, 36.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

34.06 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

38.39 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

25.38 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

2.16 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Student Results Correlated to Father’s Education Level:

Father Did Not Finish High School.

The average Science grade was 46.

In the tenth percentile, 31.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

54.25 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

35.76 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

9.70 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.30 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Father Graduated From High School.

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 63.

48.36 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

37.38 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

13.72 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.54 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Father Has Some Education After High School.

The average Science grade was 51.

In the tenth percentile, 36.

In the ninetieth percentile, 65.

35.98 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

42.04 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

20.79 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

1.19 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Father Graduated From College.

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 39.

In the ninetieth percentile, 70.

24.15 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

38.23 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

33.41 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

4.21 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Father’s Education Level Unknown.

The average Science grade was 43.

In the tenth percentile, 28.

In the ninetieth percentile, 59.

61.67 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

29.59 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

8.41 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.33 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Student Results Correlated To Mother’s Education Level:

Mother Did Not Finish High School.

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 30.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

56.98 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

34.29 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

8.46 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.27 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Mother Graduated From High School.

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 31.

In the ninetieth percentile, 62.

49.97 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

36.33 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

12.98 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.72 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Mother Has Some Education After High School.

The average Science grade was 50.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 64.

39.31 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

40.30 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

19.41 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.98 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Mother Graduated From College.

The average Science grade was 54.

In the tenth percentile, 38.

In the ninetieth percentile, 69.

27.73 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

38.78 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

29.99 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

3.50 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Mother’s Education Level Unknown.

The average Science grade was 41.

In the tenth percentile, 26.

In the ninetieth percentile, 57.

68.18 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

25.22 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

6.33 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.27 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Student Results Correlated To Parental Education Level, from Two Questions:

Parent Did Not Finish High School.

The average Science grade was 44.

In the tenth percentile, 29.

In the ninetieth percentile, 58.

58.92 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

33.22 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

7.61 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.25 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Parent Graduated From High School.

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 30.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

55.88 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

33.81 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

9.91 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.40 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Parent Had Some Education After High School.

The average Science grade was 49.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 63.

42.67 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

40.32 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

16.42 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.59 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Parent Graduated From College.

The average Science grade was 54.

In the tenth percentile, 38.

In the ninetieth percentile, 69.

28.78 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

39.03 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

28.94 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

3.25 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

Parental Education Level Unknown.

The average Science grade was 40.

In the tenth percentile, 24.

In the ninetieth percentile, 56.

72.38 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 47.

22.55 percent (Basic level) scored from 48 = (47.33%) to 59.

4.96 percent (Proficient level) scored from 60 to 73 = (73.67%).

0.10 percent (Advanced level) scored from 74 to 100.

You can read the 2019 Fourth Grade NAEP Science results here and Eighth Grade results here.

NOTE: Percentages of students may not equal 100 percent.

The Afterclap translates test results because we care enough to do what nobody else does. Present understandable results. We hope you found this post informative and will show your concern by sharing.

You can find us:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

LINKS:

2019 NAEP Fourth Grade Science Results, https://theafterclap.com/2021/05/29/2019-fourth-grade-naep-science-results/

2019 NAEP Eighth Grade Science Results, https://theafterclap.com/2021/05/31/2019-eighth-grade-naep-science-results/

SOURCE:

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2019 Science Assessment. https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/landing

2019 Eighth Grade NAEP Science Results

The effect of Parent-education levels on student learning seems to be a taboo subject. However, this release is the most recent collection point since 1971 showing the impact of Parent-education levels on student performance and included in this post. It may be information you will see for the first time in your life. 

The years from Birth to this Eighth Grade Cohort find these Lifelong learners still behind published expectations and hope. At the time of the assessment, roughly thirteen years had passed, and with the current release of information, fifteen years have passed. How is it possible to make up for fifteen years of lost learning opportunities?

The results you will see here are different from the classic misdirection released through the Media by “The U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)” to the public. The Afterclap uses a proprietary Mathematical Formula and Process, “Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score. The math is not complicated. It is math a student is expected to master before leaving the Eighth-Grade.

The process produces two essential products:

1. The percent of points earned.

2. The equivalent Classroom Grade.

Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score is vital because, in Education and Communication, the Sender must start where the Receiver’s level of knowledge is. Otherwise, all the Receiver hears or sees is misdirection or misinformation because they do not understand it. At The Afterclap, we believe a super-majority of the adults in the United States understands percents and classroom grades ranging from zero to a perfect score of one-hundred.

To convert a Percent of a Perfect Score to a classroom grade, drop the percent sign and round to the nearest whole number.  All average scores found within this post are classroom equivalent grades.

All Students

The average Science grade was 51.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 65.

32.92 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.41 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

32.51 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

2.16 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Students by Gender

Male Students

The average Science grade was a 51.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 66.

32.90 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

30.95 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

33.59 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

2.56 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Female Students

The average Science grade was 51.

In the tenth percentile, 36.

In the ninetieth percentile, 65.

32.94 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.92 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

31.39 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.75 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

National School Lunch Program eligibility, Three categories

Eligible Students

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 31.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

48.01 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.11 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

19.34 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.54 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Students Not eligible

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 42.

In the ninetieth percentile, 68.

19.34 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.44 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

44.51 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

3.71 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Students With an Unknown Status

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 42.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

19.30 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

34.22 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

43.47 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

3.01 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Race and Ethnicity using 2011 guidelines, school-reported

White Students

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 42.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

20.12 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.54 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

43.25 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

3.09 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Black Students

The average Science grade was 44.

In the tenth percentile, 29.

In the ninetieth percentile, 58.

57.82 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

28.60 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

13.33 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.25 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Hispanic Students

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

47.10 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.71 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

19.60 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.59 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Asian Students

The average Science grade was 56.

In the tenth percentile, 41.

In the ninetieth percentile, 69.

17.96 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

30.04 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

46.15 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

5.85 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

American Indian and Alaska Native Students

The average Science grade was a 48.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 69.

45.71 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.82 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

19.36 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.11 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Students

The average Science grade was 46.

In the tenth percentile, 29.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

46.00 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.49 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

20.47 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.03 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Students of two or more races

The average Science grade was 53.

In the tenth percentile, 38.

In the ninetieth percentile, 66.

27.87 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.12 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

36.21 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

2.80 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

By Parental Education Levels

By Father’s Education Level:

Father Who Did Not Finish High School

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

46.55 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.36 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

19.55 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.55 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Father Who Graduated High School

The average Science grade was 49.

In the tenth percentile, 35.

In the ninetieth percentile, 63.

37.98 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

35.24 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

25.76 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.02 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Father With Some Education After High School

The average Science grade was 53.

In the tenth percentile, 39.

In the ninetieth percentile, 65.

25.99 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

36.41 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

35.73 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.87 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Father Who Graduated College

The average Science grade was 56.

In the tenth percentile, 42.

In the ninetieth percentile, 68.

19.00 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

30.51 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

46.22 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

4.27 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Father’s Education Level Unknown

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

47.61 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

31.61 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

20.15 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.62 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

By Mother’s Education Level:

Mother Did Not Finish High School

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

48.80 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.54 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

17.23 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.44 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Mother Graduated High School

The average Science grade was 48.

In the tenth percentile, 33.

In the ninetieth percentile, 62.

42.52 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

33.64 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

23.02 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.83 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Mother With Some Education After High School

The average grade was a 52.

In the tenth percentile, 39.

In the ninetieth percentile, 65.

27.60 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

37.78 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

33.14 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.48 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Mother Graduated College

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 40.

In the ninetieth percentile, 68.

21.77 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

31.27 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

43.29 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

3.67 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Mother’s Education Level Unknown

The average Science grade was 46.

In the tenth percentile, 30.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

50.79 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

30.05 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

18.41 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.75 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Parental Education Level, From Two Questions:

Did Not Finish High School

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 31.

In the ninetieth percentile, 59.

51.72 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.60 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

15.27 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.41 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Graduated High School

The average Science grade was 47.

In the tenth percentile, 32.

In the ninetieth percentile, 61.

47.96 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

32.42 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

19.03 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.59 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Some Education After High School

The average Science grade was 51.

In the tenth percentile, 38.

In the ninetieth percentile, 64.

30.52 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

38.50 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

29.84 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

1.14 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Graduated College

The average Science grade was 55.

In the tenth percentile, 40.

In the ninetieth percentile, 67.

22.43 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

31.78 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

42.32 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

3.47 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

Unknown

The average Science grade was 45.

In the tenth percentile, 29.

In the ninetieth percentile, 60.

54.03 percent (Below Basic) scored from 0 to 46.

29.18 percent (Basic level) scored from 47 to 56.

16.40 percent (Proficient level) scored from 57 to 71.

0.39 percent (Advanced level) scored from 72 to 100.

You can read the 2019 Fourth Grade NAEP Science Results here and Twelfth Grade results here.

NOTE: Percentages of students may not equal 100 percent. We posted what was published.

The Afterclap translates test results because we care enough to do what nobody else does. Make the results understandable. We hope you found this post informative.

We hope you will share this post.

You can find us:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

SOURCE:

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2019 Science Assessment. https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/landing

2019 Fourth Grade NAEP Science Results

At the end of the time between Birth and this Fourth Grade Cohort, these Lifelong learners are already behind published expectations and hope. What was not released, if it was collected at all, was the impact of Adult-education levels. However, this impact is part of the Eighth-Grade-Cohort release. The effect of Adult-education levels is brought up because the time between a child’s birth and their fourth year in elementary school is within the years needed to lay and build the foundations for life-long learning. At the time of the assessment, roughly nine years had passed, and with the current release of information, eleven years have passed. How is it possible to make up for eleven years used ineffectively?

The results you will see here are different from the classic misdirection released through the Media by “The U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)” to the public. The Afterclap uses a proprietary Mathematical Formula and Process, “Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score. The math is not complicated. You or your child is/were expected to master it before leaving the Eighth-Grade.

The process produces two essential products:

1. The percent of points earned.

2. The equivalent Classroom Grade.

Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score is vital because, in Education and Communication, the Sender must start where the Receiver’s level of knowledge is. Otherwise, all the Receiver hears or sees is misdirection or misinformation because they do not understand it. At The Afterclap, we believe a super-majority of the adults in the United States understands percents and classroom grades ranging from zero to a perfect score of one-hundred.

To convert a Percent of a Perfect Score to a classroom grade, drop the percent sign and round to the nearest whole number.  All average scores found within this post are classroom equivalent grades.

All students

The average 2019 Fourth Grade grade in Science was 50, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 34, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 65.

26.87 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

37.54 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

34.52 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

1.07 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.                                                           

By Gender

Male

The average 2019 Male Fourth Grade grade in Science was  50, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 34, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 66.

27.21 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

36.40 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

35.24 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

1.16 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Female

The average 2019 Female Fourth Grade grade in Science was 50, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 35, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 65.

26.52 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

38.73 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

33.77 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.97 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

National School Lunch Program eligibility, by three categories

Eligible Students

The average 2019 Eligible Fourth Graders grade in Science was 46, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 30, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 60.

40.22 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

39.68 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

19.91 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.18 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Students Not eligible

The average 2019 Not Eligible Fourth Graders grade in Science was 55, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 42, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 68.

13.12 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

34.90 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

49.98 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

2.00 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Status Unknown

The average 2019 Fourth Graders grade with Unknown Eligibility in Science was 54, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 41, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 67.

14.75 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

38.95 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

44.61 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

1.69 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Race and Ethnicity using 2011 guidelines, school-reported

White

The average 2019 White Fourth Graders grade in Science was 54, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 41, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 67.

14.95 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

36.83 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

46.84 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

1.39 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Black

The average 2019 Black Fourth Graders grade in Science was 43, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 28, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 56.

49.31 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

36.86 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

13.72 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.11 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Hispanic

The average 2019 Hispanic Fourth Graders grade in Science 46, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 31, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 60.

38.66 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

40.72 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

20.32 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.30 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Asian

The average 2019 Asian Fourth Graders grade in Science was 56, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 40, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 71.

14.56 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

30.22 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

50.96 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

4.25 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

American Indian and Alaska Native

The average 2019 American Indian and Alaska Native Fourth Graders Grade in Science was 47, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 31, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 61.

35.54 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

40.68 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

23.25 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.53 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

The average 2019 Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Fourth Graders grade in Science was 47, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 31, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 63.

36.59 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

37.60 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

25.16 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

0.65 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

Two or more races

The average 2019 of two or more races Fourth Graders grade in Science was 53, and students scoring in the tenth percentile a 38, and those scoring in the ninetieth percentile a 67.

20.81 Percent of Students scored Below Basic level, earning a grade from 0 to 43.

36.14 Percent of Students scored at the Basic level, earning a grade from 44 to 55.

41.11 Percent of Students scored at the Proficient level, earning a grade from 56 to 74.

1.94 Percent of Students scored at the Advanced level, earning a grade from 75 to 100.

You can read the 2019 Eighth Grade NAEP Science results here and Twelfth Grade results here.

NOTE: Percents of students may not equal 100 percent. We posted what was published.

The Afterclap translates test results because we care enough to do what nobody else does. Make the results understandable. We hope you found this post informative.

If you find education important, we hope you will share this post.

You can find us:

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

SOURCE:

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2019 Science Assessment. https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/landing

THOUGHT BOX: Is the Biden Ed Plan DEAD on Inception? Unless…

THOUGHT BOX: Is the Biden Education Plan DEAD on Inception Unless we Develop Generations of Academic-parenting Parents?

Before introducing the concept of academic-parenting, we want to go on the record. Based on decades of documentation, we support preschool expansion because evidence shows the necessity for it. And would support two additional years of high school because evidence shows a need for it as well. And we believe the presidents’ plan, “as we currently understand it,” will not create the long-term education changes this country needs without empowering and engaging parents to build a better student and support them. Is the concept perfect? No. And we are still looking for something better for parents (not the government) to do with and for their children. The only thing The Afterclap would ask of all levels of governance, is to support the concept of parents helping their children.

All data implied above and shown below was provided courtesy of elements of the United States Government. Meaning that somebody in Washington D.C. should know and understand the data indicated and shown in this post.

Academic-parenting is a concept that grew out of my early studies of how to improve the Quality of the Condition of Education at the school my youngest attended at the time. And from several surprising and unexpected admissions by fifth and sixth-grade parents challenge to help and support their child at home. By the fall of 2008, I had a solution and a descriptive name. I believed then and still do, there is a need for academic-parenting. Currently, I am functioning as an Autodidact Education Anthropologist whose primary concern is for the Quality of the Condition of Learning, not education. You will see below a tiny portion of the evidence showing the need for academic-parenting skills in the last part of this post.

In a general sense: Academic-Parenting is activities you can do with your kids to prepare them for Learning in a formal Teaching environment and support them through High school graduation. The goal is to keep it super simple. And the following academic-parenting reading exercise is an example:

1. Reading to your child before they know how to read, and then discussing what you read with them.*

2.  Reading the same book or text with them as they learn to read. Then discussing it afterward.*

3. Reading together. Not necessarily the same book or text. Or even at the same time. Then discussing what each of you read.*

* Discussing is not a lecture. It is a conversation where all parties are comfortable expressing themselves. Effective communication between you and anyone is identical to building a bridge. The longer you build on the bridge and keep it open, the stronger it becomes. But if it collapses, it is hard to rebuild. And children (bless them) may occasionally be trying. The goal is to keep them comfortable and the communication bridge open as you use your parental authority to address the situation.

I suspect many of you found the KISS reading exercise familiar. And while it is simple, it is not necessarily easy. One of the goals envisioned with the academic-parenting concept in 2008 was to become multigenerational, building on the success of the previous generation of parents by the new generation of parents. And this short description is not the whole story. When I spoke to my local school board about academic-parenting in October of 2008, I was laughed at when I opened my presentation by stating we need to engage and employ 25,000 parents in our school system. But they weren’t laughing by the time I finished. They were impressed enough with the concept to schedule another meeting to discover if the District could engage and employ 25,000 parents. Eventually, the District gave up on the idea. And while I was hopeful, I was not surprised. Today unlike then, I can show evidence there is a need.

The following section shows a tiny amount of the fact-checkable evidence from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) measurements of academic scholarship.

1971 Parental Education impact on 17-year-old student acquisition of Reading Proficiency; TABLE 1: Parent Education Level and Corresponding Percentage of available Points earned by Mean or Average Score(1):

> Not a high school graduate = 52%

> Graduated high school = 57%

> Some education after high school = 60%

Mean or Average Score percentages in Table 1; are the equivalent of a classroom grade and a letter grade of an “F” if the minimum classroom proficiency threshold were a 70 or better.

1978 Parental Education impact on 17-year-old students learning of Mathematics Proficiency; TABLE 2: Parent Education Level and Corresponding Percentage of available Points earned by Mean or Average Score(2):

> Not a high school graduate = 56%

> Graduated high school = 49%

> Some education after high school = 61%

> Graduated college = 63%

Mean or Average Score percentages in Table 2; are the equivalent of a classroom grade and a letter grade of an “F” if the minimum classroom proficiency threshold were a 70 or better.

I am skipping past more than Forty-one years of additional evidence to 2019.

2019 Parental Education impact on 12th-Grade student acquisition of Reading Proficiency; TABLE 3: Parent Education Level and Corresponding Percentage of available Points earned by Mean or Average Score(3):

> Did not finish high school = 54%

> Graduated high school = 54%

> Some education after high school = 57%

> Graduated college = 59%

> Unknown = 51%

Mean or Average Score percentages in Table 3; are the equivalent of a classroom grade and a letter grade of an “F” if the minimum classroom proficiency threshold were a 70 or better.

2019 Parental Education impact on 12th-Grade student acquisition of Mathematics Proficiency; TABLE 4: Parent Education Level and Corresponding Percentage of available Points earned by Mean or Average Score(4):

> Did not finish high school = 44%

> Graduated high school = 45%

> Some education after high school = 49%

> Graduated college = 54%

> Unknown = 42%

Mean or Average Score percentages in Table 4; are the equivalent of a classroom grade and a letter grade of an “F” if the minimum classroom proficiency threshold were a 70 or better.

What you have seen is the impact of the parental educational level of students near or during their last year in high school. This post is a quick snapshot of the beginning and latest results of a 41 year-plus window of data and does not include 13-year-old and 8th-grade results.

Parental Education Impact: is a sensitive issue for more than the two reasons shown here:

One, I have yet to hear or read an open discussion of the impact of adult knowledge on their kid(s).

Two, some people focus feed and foster the public narrative around economics while ignoring or unaware of the impact of parents’ education level.

The failure to bring this information to the public forum is detrimental to improving the Quality of the Condition of Learning.

If you have made the mistake of presuming, I am stating we haven’t made some improvements. We have! One example, we don’t institutionalize children diagnosed on the Autistic Spectrum as much anymore. In 1999 a member of the medical profession suggested my wife and I place our youngest in an institution. We lost my wife to complications from cancer in 2004. And I have been a single parent since. As for our youngest, he will receive his master’s degree in history later this month. There was no Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or 504 plan for students when I was in school. And if you look at the 1971 or 1978 “Graduated from high school” results, I was below that average during the birth through high school graduation years. Yet, I was promoted every year on time. I did not know of a term describing what happened to me until then, governor of Texas George Washington Bush started talking about “No Child Left Behind” in 1999. I did not become a student until after I was 21-years old. Before that, I was in survival mode. And if you ever felt lost when you could not help your child with their homework as a parent, I know how you felt. Forty-eight years later, I am not that 21-year-old. I have worked at making up for the lost opportunities at Learning.

METHODOLOGY:

At, The Afterclap we translate large-scale Standardized Test measurement systems through a process named “Calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score.” This KISS (keep it super simple) method converts results to a percentage and equivalent classroom grade. This translation eliminates the need for an education authority to tell you what they want you to believe. Or provide an explanation you may not understand. The process was created by a Founder of The Afterclap. He spent nine years serving on Public School Councils with a Georgia legislated expectation to make positive suggestions to improve the Quality of the Condition of Education in the school he served. And be able to explain how well students performed on large-scale standardized assessments to parents and interested stakeholders. As a parent, he understands the implications of the Classroom Grade and suspects you do as well. If your child brings home a grade of 57, the score eliminates some questions and opens the door to specific targeted questions from “what did you learn today?” To, “what have you not learned yet?”

Bruce Kendall, Founder

We Translate Standardized Test results for Stakeholders because we care enough to do what nobody else does. Make the results understandable.

Web: https://theafterclap.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-Afterclap-107153424017370

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@TAfterclap

SOURCES:

(1) 1995 > Digest of Education Statistics > National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Long Term Trends. > “Table 105. Average student proficiency in reading, by age and selected characteristics of students: 1971 to 1992.”> Where the earliest year listed for Parental education impact on 17-year-olds in “Reading Proficiency” was 1971. https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d95/dtab105.asp

(2) 1999 > Digest of Education Statistics > National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Long Term Trends. > “Table 123. Average mathematics proficiency, by age and by selected characteristics of students: 1973 to 1996.” Where the earliest year listed for Parental education impact on 17-year-olds in “Mathematics Proficiency” was 1978 https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d99/d99t123.asp

(3) 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reading, Grade 12, Parental education level, from 2 questions [PARED] and National jurisdiction. https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/landing

(4) 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Mathematics, Grade 12, Parental education level, from 2 questions [PARED] and National jurisdiction. https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/landing

Drinking the Kool-Aide and Thinking

It’s after 1:00 pm in my time zone, and I am preparing breakfast.

My sleep and woke cycles have shifted again.

While I was drinking the kool-aide this morning during breakfast preparations, I wondered if there was a fount of knowledge to be found on social media.

And what is it with this negativity business about drinking the kool-aide.

I like cool-aide. I especially like mixing grape and apple-flavored kool-aide.

So let me ask you an important question. Just for my edification.

Especially since we have all been in the current medical pandemic together:

Do you think it’s too early to start singing Christmas songs?

Or am I being too hopeful?

What do you think?

Not sure. Ask your friends and neighbors. We are all in this together whether we want to be or not.

Peace. Be Well. And do Good!

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades revised to include students left behind

“Because The Georgia Milestones was not administered during the 2019-2020 school year, The Afterclap will re-post previous posts with newly available datum and revise and update where applicable. Additionally, we will start posting past years of Milestones datum.”

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scaled Scores as Classroom Grade equivalents revised to include students left behind.

2019 was another season of failed expectations for Georgia’s students, as they progress from Birth to High school Graduation, where more than 80 percent failed to achieve a benchmark grade of 70 or better on Georgia’s Milestones Assessments of Elementary students. For the approximately 7 to 16 percent of students across domains meeting or exceeding the 70 benchmarks, Congratulations.

In this post, the 2019 Milestones mean scaled scores were translated to a percent of a perfect score and rounded to two decimal places. The result is an equivalent classroom grade on a scale of 0 to 100. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges are rounded to one decimal place. All datum is stated as its classroom equivalent grades. Percentages of students may not total 100 percent due to the Georgia Department of Education rounding.

 

Third Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand one hundred fifty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.63. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned grades ranging from 0.0 to 44.3

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned grades ranging from 44.6 to 56.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 39 percent earned grades ranging from 56.6 to 69.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned grades ranging from 69.9 to 100

Approximately 88 percent-plus of Third Grade students were left behind in Mathematics.

 

Third Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand two hundred thirty-one students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 50.92. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 29 percent earned grades ranging from 0.0 to 45.2

(2) Developing Learner, 29 percent earned grades ranging from 45.4 to 52.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 28 percent earned grades ranging from 53.1 to 61.5

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned grades ranging from 61.7 to 100

Approximately 86 percent-plus of Third Grade students were left behind in English Language Arts.

 

Third Grade Reading status

Of the 129,231 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

So how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 14 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fourth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand four hundred eighty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.30. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 45.8

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned grades ranging from 46.1 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 36 percent earned grades ranging from 57.3 to 70.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned grades ranging from 70.8 to 100

Approximately 87 percent of Forth Grade students were left behind in Mathematics.

 

Fourth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand five hundred forty-seven students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.80. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 25 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 46.7

(2) Developing Learner, 32 percent earned grades ranging from 46.9 to 55.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned grades ranging from 55.8 to 64.2

(4) Distinguished Learner, 16 percent earned grades ranging from 64.4 to 100

Approximately 84 percent-plus of Fourth Grade students were left behind in English Language Arts.

 

Fourth Grade Reading status

In 2019, Of the 133,547 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 36 percent below grade level and 64 percent at or above grade level.

So how is it possible that 64 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 16 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand four hundred fifty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.78. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 45.4

(2) Developing Learner, 35 percent earned grades ranging from 45.7 to 56.3

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned grades ranging from 56.5 to 68.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned grades ranging from 68.5 to 100

Approximately 86 percent-plus of Fifth Grade students were left behind in Mathematics.

 

Fifth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand five hundred thirteen students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.81. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 48.0

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned grades ranging from 48.2 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 34 percent earned grades ranging from 57.3 to 68.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned grades ranging from 68.5 to 100

Approximately 89 percent-plus of Fifth Grade students were left behind in English Language Arts.

 

Fifth Grade Reading status

Of the 136,513 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

So how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 11 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Social Studies

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.87. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 47 percent earned Grades ranging from 49.3 to 62.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 19 percent earned grades ranging from 62.7 to 70.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned grades ranging from 70.7 to 100

Approximately 88 percent of Fifth Grade students were left behind in Social Studies.

 

Fifth Grade Science

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.09. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 30 percent earned grades ranging from 0 to 50.6

(2) Developing Learner, 27 percent earned grades ranging from 50.8 to 58.7

(3) Proficient Learner, 30 percent earned grades ranging from 58.9 to 70.0

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned grades ranging from 70.2 to 100

Approximately 87 percent of Fifth Grade students were left behind in Social Studies.

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

As a startup, we are hoping you will find The Afterclap informative, different, and engaging. If you do, we would appreciate your following and sharing.

We are a work in progress, and our first goal is to show assessment results in an obvious, understandable, relatable way. We believe if the results were; evident, understandable, and relatable. Educational Authorities would not need to explain them to their satisfaction. Or for you to need The Afterclap to translate the Education Authorities imagineered scaled scores.

We welcome questions about the work and suggestions pertinent to accomplishing our goal.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

SOURCES USED:

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

Georgia’s 2019 NAEP, Part V: Eighth Grade Reading, Ethnic and Gender, Grades and Gaps

Students identified as Asians as part of a group, and as a single group has led the nation in Reading on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) results since 2009. In 2019 notwithstanding their level of academic leadership, more than 85 percent of Georgia Eighth-Grade Asian students were left behind in Reading.

This post is Part Five of five posts addressing the Georgia 2019 NAEP assessments. Use the following links for Part One The Corrected and Upgraded Edition, Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four.

Conventions used throughout the post:

Ethnic groups and genders are listed by demonstrated NAEP academic performance results, from the highest to the lowest-achieving group.

All reported NAEP scaled scores are mathematically converted to their 0-to-100 scale conventional classroom equivalents using a process described as calculating the Percent of a Perfect Score (PPS) and referred to as Grades. All Grades rounded to the nearest whole number. All performance level descriptors (grades) are adjusted to whole numbers to show partition. Percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number and may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Georgia’s 2019 Eighth Grade Reading by Race/Ethnicity and Gender using 2011 guidelines, as school-reported

Georgia Students Identified as Asian

 Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 57
  • National, 57

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 12 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 30 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 44 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 15 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 48
  • The twenty-fifth, 53
  • The fiftieth, 58
  • The seventy-fifth, 62
  • The ninetieth, 66

 Summary: more than 85 percent of Georgia’s Eighth Grade Students identified as Asian left behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as Two or more races

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 55
  • National, 55

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 14 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 37 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 43 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 6 percent

 Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 47
  • The twenty-fifth, 52
  • The fiftieth, 56
  • The seventy-fifth, 60
  • The ninetieth, 63

Summary: More than 94 percent of Georgia’s Eighth Grade Students identified as Two or more races left behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as White

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 54
  • National, 54

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 18 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 38 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 38 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 5 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 45
  • The twenty-fifth, 50
  • The fiftieth, 55
  • The seventy-fifth, 59
  • The ninetieth, 62

Summary: more than 95 percent of Georgia’s Eighth Grade Students identified as White left behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as Female

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 54
  • National, 53

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 22 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 39 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 34 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 5 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 45
  • The twenty-fifth, 49
  • The fiftieth, 54
  • The seventy-fifth, 59
  • The ninetieth, 62

Summary: more than 95 percent of Georgia Eighth Grade Students identified as Female left behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as Male

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 51
  • National, 52

 Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 34 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 40 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 24 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 2 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 41
  • The twenty-fifth, 46
  • The fiftieth, 52
  • The seventy-fifth, 56
  • The ninetieth, 60

Summary: more than 97 percent of Georgia Eighth Grade Students identified as left Male behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as Hispanic

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 51
  • National, 50

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 33 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 42 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 24 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 2 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 41
  • The twenty-fifth, 47
  • The fiftieth, 52
  • The seventy-fifth, 56
  • The ninetieth, 60

Summary: more than 98 percent of Georgia’s Eighth Grade Students identified as Hispanic left behind in Reading.

 

Georgia Students Identified as Black

Average Reading Grades:

  • Georgia, 50
  • National, 49

Percentage by Performance Level:

  • Below Basic (0 to 48) Grades, 41 percent
  • Basic (49 to 56) Grades, 41 percent
  • Proficient (57 to 64) Grades, 17 percent
  • Advanced (65 to 100) Grades, 1 percent

Average Grade by Percentile:

  • The tenth, 41
  • The twenty-fifth, 45
  • The fiftieth, 50
  • The seventy-fifth, 55
  • The ninetieth, 58

Summary; more than 98 percent of Georgia Eighth Grade Students identified as Black left behind in Reading.

 

TABLE 1: Georgia Eighth Grade Reading Gaps by Identified Ethnicity and Gender. In Descending Order and Difference.

Students Identified as GRADE GAP Difference from Asian Students
Asian 57  
Two or more races 55 2
White 54 3
Female 54 3
National All students 53 4
Georgia All students 52 5
Hispanic 51 6
Male 51 6
Black 50 7*

* Table 1: shows the NAEP difference between Asian and Black student results when viewed as PPS equivalent traditional grade values as 7 points.

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METHODOLOGY

All NAEP scaled scores are calculated as a percent of a perfect score (equivalent to grades on the zero-to-100 scale) and rounded to the nearest whole number. Example: a 246.28 NAEP scale score reported as a 246 calculated as a percent of a perfect score is a 49. Except for NAEP scale scores showing exit and entry points between proficiency levels, which are adjusted up or down to the nearest whole number delineating performance levels. Due to the rounding of published NAEP scaled scores, the estimated margin of error is a possible plus or minus two NAEP scale points. As a percent of a perfect score, the estimated margin of error is less than one-half of a grade point difference.

LINKS AND LIST OF TABLES USED:

Part 1: https://theafterclap.com/2019/11/02/georgias-2019-naep-performance-as-grades-part-1-01-the-corrected-and-upgraded-edition/

Part 2: https://theafterclap.com/2019/11/22/georgias-2019-naep-ethnic-and-gender-fourth-grade-math-performance-as-grades-part-2/

Part 3: https://theafterclap.com/2019/12/03/georgias-2019-naep-ethnic-and-gender-eighth-grade-math-performance-as-grades-part-3/

Part 4: https://theafterclap.com/2020/05/06/georgias-2019-naep-part-iv-fourth-grade-reading-ethnic-and-gender-grades-and-gaps/

NAEP Data Explorer Reports https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/xplore/NDE:

> Average scale scores and percentages at each achievement level for grade 8 reading, by race/ethnicity using 2011 guidelines, school-reported [SRACE10] and jurisdiction: 2019

> Average scale scores and percentages at each achievement level for grade 8 reading, by all students [TOTAL] and jurisdiction: 2019

> Average scale scores and percentages at each achievement level for grade 8 reading, by Gender [GENDER] and jurisdiction: 2019

> Average scale scores and percentile scores for grade 8 reading, by race/ethnicity using 2011 guidelines, school-reported [SRACE10] and jurisdiction: 2019

> Average scale scores and percentile scores for grade 8 reading, by Gender [GENDER] and jurisdiction: 2019

> Average scale scores and percentile scores for grade 8 reading, by all students [TOTAL] and jurisdiction: 2019