Georgia’s CCRPI, anchored to invented scales and fictional achievement levels.

Georgia’s CCRPI is currently anchored to the Georgia Department of Education (DOE) 2019 Milestones assessments descriptions of Continent Mastery, Progress, and Closing Achievement Gaps. The first three CCRPI items listed by the AJC article author Ty Tagami here, inspiring this post.

 

OPINION, I have to write an opinion because I get a little literary in my expressed disbelief. However, Grades are correct as rounded and adjusted for continuity and understanding. Example: Grades between levels of 71.2 and 71.3 would be adjusted to a 70 and 71 to show the exit and entry point between levels.

 

Let’s start with invented scales to describe student accomplishment.

 

The first part of the invented scales is the multiple scale score scaling systems used, instead of the 0 to 100 scale. And instead of listing all of them here we will list only Fourth and Eighth Grade scale range’s for English Language Arts (ELA), and Math in honor of Georgia’s 2019 NAEP accomplishments:

 

Fourth Grade ELA scale score range 210 to 775

Fourth Grade Mathematics scale score range 270 to 715

Eighth Grade ELA scale score range 225 to 730

Eighth Grade Mathematics scale score range 275 to 755

 

The second part of the invented scales is their explicitly described use in achievement levels. While the description of what was done by GA DOE was not provided for the Third through Eighth Grades, it was provided when fulfilling a Freedom of Information Request made to Georgia’s Department of Education for the high school assessments. Here I will use one example from all of the assessments.

 

The Ninth Grade Literature and Composition scale score range was 220 to 735. And students who received a scale score of 220 through 474 were Level one Beginning Learners. And if the scale score was a 474, according to GA DOE, that was equivalent to a grade of 67.

 

And if that were all you knew, then you would not know what was wrong.

 

The 220 is the real-world equivalent of 0.0. Also, in the real world, the 474 is only 49 percent of the scale range and the equivalent of a grade of a 49. The difference between the kind of math you and I use to pay our bills and balance our checkbooks would make the difference between the grade of 67 and the grade of 49 to be an 18 point grade inflation.

 

The grade inflation is the kind of gift that hides how many children were left behind last year. It also hides the massive level of failure to properly educate children to even the most basic level of mastery. And since I brought up mastery, let’s skip Developing Learners and look at both proficient and distinguished learners score ranges as grades.

 

Achievement Level 3: Proficient Learner scale score range as grades, 59 to  69

Achievement Level 4: Distinguished Learner scale score range as grades, 71 to 100

 

Of last year’s Georgia Ninth Grade Literature and Composition Class of 2022, based on the milestones published results, 83.3 percent of the students were left behind.

 

13.4 percent left behind with rounded Grades ranging from, 0 to 49

25.9 percent left behind with rounded Grades ranging from, 50 to 59

44.0 percent left behind with rounded Grades ranging from, 60 to 69

 

It is kind of hard to have significant progress when a supermajority of students are left behind every year. And since no effort is reported showing the students left behind were brought up to speed or recovered from their demonstrated lack of mastery, it is hard to believe that GA DOE wants to own up to it, which brings up Georgia’s performance on last year’s NAEP.

 

In Georgia’s 2019 NAEP All Students category for both English and Reading domains, and Grades an estimated 91% plus of the students assessed had been left behind and failed to score, a scaled score equivalent grade of 70. You can read a detailed breakdown here.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

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Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia’s 2019 NAEP Performance as Grades Part 1.01 The Corrected and Upgraded Edition

Related soon to be revised and republished to include how many students were left behind:

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

LINKS AND SOURCES USED:

Why Georgia is looking at another overhaul of report card for schools, By Ty Tagami, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2019 1101

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

Spring 2019 EOC – State  [https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOC%20-%20State%20Level.xlsx]

2019 End-of-Grade EOC Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer [https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Assessment/Documents/Milestones/EOC-Resources/EOC_Score_Interpretation_Guide_2018-19.pdf]

NAEP Data Explorer https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/xplore/NDE

Georgia’s 2019 NAEP Performance as Grades Part 1.01 The Corrected and Upgraded Edition

In the All Students category for both English and Reading domains, an estimated 91% plus of the students assessed had been left behind and failed to score, a scaled score equivalent grade of 70.

We apologize for the Fourth Grade Math typos. Despite hiding out on the internet we are human, but unlike the media, we don’t hide our mistakes on page six. We give you a splashy headline, and to make it worth your time, we are including percentage estimates of the students left behind.

In this post, Grades and percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number, or adjusted to show continuity when two grades or percentages would round to the same whole number. Percentages may exceed 100%.

This post is part one of five posts addressing Georgia’s 2019 NAEP assessments, follow links for Part Two, and Part Three

 

Fourth Grade Students Mathematics scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 48

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 42 was 23 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 43 to 49, was 41 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 50 to 56, was 28 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 57 to 100, was 9 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 40

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 43

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 48

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 52

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 56

The assessment shows an estimated 91% plus of Georgia’s students have been left behind academically in Fourth Grade Mathematics.

 

Eighth Grade Students Mathematics scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 57

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of  0 to 52, was 33 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 53 to 59, was 36 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 60 to 66, was 22 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 67 to 100, was 9 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 46

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 51

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 56

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 61

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 66

The assessment shows an estimated 91 % plus of Georgia’s students have been left behind academically in Eighth Grade Mathematics.

 

Fourth Grade Students Reading scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 44

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 41, was 37 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 42 to 47, was 31 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 48 to 53, was 23 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 54 to 100, was 9 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 33

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 39

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 44

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 49

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 53

The assessment shows an estimated 91% plus of Georgia’s students have been left behind academically in Fourth Grade Reading.

 

Eighth Grade Students Reading scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 52

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 48, was 28 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 49 to 56, was 40 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 57 to 64, was 29 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of  65 to 100, was 4 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 43

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 48

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 53

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 58

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 61

The assessment shows an estimated 96% plus of Georgia’s students have been left behind academically in Eighth Grade Reading.

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

As a startup, we are hoping you will find The Afterclap informative, different, and interesting. If you do, we would appreciate your following and sharing.

We are a work in progress, and our first goal is to show assessment results in a self-evident, understandable, and relatable way. We believe if the results were; self-evident, understandable, and relatable. Educational Authorities would not need to explain them to their satisfaction. Or for you to need The Afterclap to translate the Education Authorities explanation.

We welcome questions about the work and suggestions pertinent to accomplishing our goal.

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

LINK AND SOURCE USED:

NAEP Data Explorer https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/xplore/NDE

Georgia’s 2019 NAEP Performance as Grades Part 1

This post is not the news or a regurgitation of a press release. It is the NAEP results as Grades. And you will not be told what to think or believe about them. Do you have the courage to continue reading?

In this post, Grades and percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number, or adjusted to show continuity when two grades or percentages would round to the same whole number. Percentages may exceed 100%.

 

Fourth Grade Students Mathematics scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 48

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 42 was 41 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 43 to 48, was 42 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 49 to 56, was 48 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 57 to 100, was 54 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 40

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 43

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 48

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 52

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 56

 

Eighth Grade Students Mathematics scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 57

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of  0 to 52, was 33 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 53 to 59, was 36 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 60 to 66, was 22 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 67 to 100, was 9 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 46

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 51

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 56

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 61

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 66

 

Fourth Grade Students Reading scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 44

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 41, was 37 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 42 to 47, was 31 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 48 to 53, was 23 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of 54 to 100, was 9 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 33

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 39

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 44

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 49

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 53

 

Eighth Grade Students Reading scores as Grades:

Georgia’s average Student Grade was a 52

Percent of students scoring Below Basic with Grades of 0 to 48, was 28 percent

Percent of students scoring at Basic with Grades of 49 to 56, was 40 percent

Percent of students scoring at Proficient with Grades of 57 to 64, was 29 percent

Percent of students scoring at Advanced with Grades of  65 to 100, was 4 percent

Average Grade for Students scoring in the tenth percentile was a 43

Average Grade for Students scoring in the twenty-fifth percentile was a 48

Average Grade for Students scoring in the fiftieth percentile was a 53

Average Grade for Students scoring in the seventy-fifth percentile was a 58

Average Grade for Students scoring in the ninetieth percentile Grade was a 61

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

As a startup, we are hoping you will find The Afterclap informative, different, and interesting. If you do, we would appreciate your following and sharing.

We are a work in progress, and our first goal is to show assessment results in a self-evident, understandable, and relatable way. We believe if the results were; self-evident, understandable, and relatable. Educational Authorities would not need to explain them to their satisfaction. Or for you to need The Afterclap to translate the Education Authorities explanation.

We welcome questions about the work and suggestions pertinent to accomplishing our goal.

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

LINK AND SOURCE USED:

NAEP Data Explorer https://www.nationsreportcard.gov/ndecore/xplore/NDE

 

Is Georgia’s CCRPI, Broke? A Conclusion Based on Facts

OPINION

Conclusion: The state’s College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) is a flawed view of Georgia’s schools.

Reasons why:

One, Content Mastery.

The state’s standards (“assessment standards,” not curriculum standards) for English, Maths, Science, and Social Studies as measured by Milestones are mostly Failing Grades. And mathematically those Performance Levels, are not what Stakeholders are lead to believe.

Two, Progress.

Close to 80% of Third thorough Twelfth-grade students in Georgia were left behind in 2019, with no specifically allocated time in the State’s one-hundred eighty-day Curriculum for Remediation. And based on the Data (in hand) provided by the Georgia Department of Education, supermajorities of children have been left behind every year from 2007 through 2019.

If Remediation is not a part of the process, how can the students show growth when students did not acquire significant portions of the curriculum, or have gaps in the progressive knowledge required to show growth?

And you cannot show growth unless the state is tracking students by Graduation Cohorts, which is not how the results are presented to Stakeholders. Generally, what is presented, is a comparison and contrast (just like we were supposed to do in English Class) of two different Graduation Cohorts.

Three, Closing Gaps.

The Gaps, while technically correct are inflated. Depending on the grade or discipline the inflation factor is frequently five or larger, from a scale of zero to one-hundred. We are a lot closer when looking at Total Groups using a zero to one-hundred scale, than what Education Authorities let Stakeholders believe.

Four, Readiness.

The evaluation of what schools offer beyond regular classes may be the only reasonable measurement in the CCRPI.

Five, Graduation Rate.

How can Graduation rates be so high, when the study of the last thirteen years of Georgia’s assessments shows an estimated 80 percent of the students graduating from high school left without the basic level of education expected of a high school graduate. How is gifting a student with a certificate of graduation that is not worth the value of a high school level education doing a service to the students, their family, or anyone?

Because a supermajority of the scaled scores shows failing results when mathematically converted to Grades.

For 2019 examples:

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

As a startup, we are hoping you will find The Afterclap informative, different, and interesting. If you do, we would appreciate your following and sharing.

We are a work in progress, and our goal is to show the results in an understandable and relatable way. We also believe if you understand the results, you do not need an Educational Authority to tell you what they want you to believe, because the results should be self-evident. We welcome questions about the work and suggestions pertinent to accomplishing our goal.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

LINKS AND SOURCES USED:

[https://theafterclap.com/2019/10/17/2019-georgia-milestones-elementary-scores-as-grades/]

[https://theafterclap.com/2019/10/18/2019-georgia-milestones-middle-school-scores-as-grades/]

[https://theafterclap.com/2019/10/22/2019-georgia-milestones-high-school-scores-as-grades/]

Georgia Department of Education releases 2019 CCRPI reports [https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Pages/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?PressView=default&pid=720]

Metro Atlanta educators question school ratings’ validity – AJC  [https://www.ajc.com/news/local-education/metro-atlanta-educators-question-school-rating-validity/jRKOAKcAMTOmO7umnwrgnN]

Does Georgia’s CCRPI rating system need CPR? – AJC [https://www.ajc.com/blog/get-schooled/does-georgia-ccrpi-rating-system-need-cpr/nHsk29I6H1rKgpP9wnI3MI/]

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

Spring 2019 EOC – State  [https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOC%20-%20State%20Level.xlsx]

2019 End-of-Grade EOG Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer [https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Assessment/Documents/Milestones/EOC-Resources/EOC_Score_Interpretation_Guide_2018-19.pdf]

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

During the 2018-2019 school year, Georgia’s high school students continued to struggle their way through the final four years of the Birth-through-high school graduation years.  With an estimated 80 percent failing to earn a Grade better than a 70.

This is the third and final post covering Georgia’s 2019 Milestones assessments; you can follow the links for the Elementary Grades and Middle school Grades.

In this post, Mean Grades are rounded to two decimal places. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges of grades are rounded to one decimal place.

 

Ninth Grade Literature and Composition Class of 2022

In 2019, One hundred twelve thousand two hundred twenty students assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 60.97, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 13.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.3

(2) Developing Learner, 25.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.5 to 59.0

(3) Proficient Learner, 44.0 percent earned a Grade ranging from 59.2 to 71.0

(4) Distinguished Learner, 16.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 71.3 to 100

 

Ninth Grade Literature and Composition Class of 2022 Reading status

Of the 112,220 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 17.5 percent below grade level and 82.5 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 82.5 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when only 16.7 percent earned a Grade of a 71.3 or better?

 

American Literature and Composition

In 2019, Ninety-seven thousand five hundred eighty-eight students assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 58.57, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 20 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 50.7

(2) Developing Learner, 326 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.9 to 59.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 38.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 59.8 to 71.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 8.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 71.4 to 100

 

American Literature and Composition Reading status

Of the 97,588 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 24.8 percent below grade level and 75.2 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 75.2 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when only 8.7 percent earned a Grade of a 71.4 or better?

 

Coordinate Algebra

In 2019, Seventeen thousand nine hundred fifty-one students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 50.78, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 30.8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 45.0

(2) Developing Learner, 35.5 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.2 to 53.7

(3) Proficient Learner, 26.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 53.9 to 65.7

(4) Distinguished Learner, 7.3 percent earned a Grade ranging from 65.9 to 100

 

Analytic Geometry

In 2019, Fifteen thousand four hundred five students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 51.36, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 32.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from a 0.0 to 46.2

(2) Developing Learner, 32.8 percent earned a Grade ranging from a 46.4 to 54.2

(3) Proficient Learner, 27.2 percent earned a Grade ranging from a 54.4 to 65.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 7.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from a 65.8 to 100

 

Algebra I

In 2019, One hundred six thousand one hundred six students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 54.02, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 27.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 46.8

(2) Developing Learner, 31.5 percent earned a Grade ranging from 47.0 to 55.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 29.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 55.6 to 67.2

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 67.4 to 100

 

Geometry

In 2019, Eighty-four thousand six hundred ninety-two students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 52.76, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 29.1 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 46.3

(2) Developing Learner, 30.1 percent earned a Grade ranging from 46.5 to 54.2

(3) Proficient Learner, 30.0 percent earned a Grade ranging from 54.3 to 65.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 10.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 65.5 to 100

 

Biology

In 2019, One hundred four thousand six hundred forty students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.91, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 28.6 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 22.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 56.5

(3) Proficient Learner, 34.7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.6 to 68.8

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14.3 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.0 to 100

 

Physical Science

In 2019, Seventy-five thousand sixty students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.42, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 25.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 27.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 56.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 33.8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.7 to 68.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 12.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.5 to 100

 

United States History

In 2019, Ninety-three thousand twenty-eight students were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.55, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 21.8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 47.1

(2) Developing Learner, 29.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 47.3 to 56.2

(3) Proficient Learner, 33.9 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.4 to 68

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.2 to 100

 

Economics, Business, and Free Enterprise

In 2019, Sixty-one thousand eight hundred twenty-one students assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.09, with a Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels of:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 25.8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 48.4

(2) Developing Learner, 26.6 percent earned a Grade ranging from 48.5 to 55.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 34.3 percent earned a Grade ranging from 55.8 to 68

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13.4 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.1 to 100

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

As a startup, we are hoping you will find The Afterclap informative, different, and interesting. If you do, we would appreciate your following and sharing.

We are a work in progress, and our goal is to show the results in an understandable and relatable way. We also believe if you understand the results, you do not need an Educational Authority to tell you what they want you to believe, because the results should be self-evident. We welcome questions about the work and suggestions pertinent to accomplishing our goal.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

 

Updated 2019 1023 0350hrs: Changed wording in the introduction for clarity.

 

LINKS AND SOURCES USED:

[https://theafterclap.com/2019/10/17/2019-georgia-milestones-elementary-scores-as-grades/]

[https://theafterclap.com/2019/10/18/2019-georgia-milestones-middle-school-scores-as-grades/]

Spring 2019 EOC – State  [https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOC%20-%20State%20Level.xlsx]

2019 End-of-Grade EOG Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer [https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Assessment/Documents/Milestones/EOC-Resources/EOC_Score_Interpretation_Guide_2018-19.pdf]

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 was an unkind season of excessive failure for Georgia’s Middle School students, as they traveled forward through the Birth-to-High-school-Graduation years. As more than 80 percent failed to score better than a 70 on, Georgia’s Milestones Assessments of Middle school students. For the 7 to possibly 15 percent of passing students, Congratulations.

This is the second of three posts covering Georgia’s 2019 Milestones assessments; you can follow the links for the Elementary Grades and High School Grades

In this post, Mean Grades are rounded to two decimal places. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges of grades are rounded to one decimal place.

 

Sixth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand six hundred twenty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2025; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.90. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.5

(2) Developing Learner, 39 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.8 to 57.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.8 to 70.8

(4) Distinguished Learner, 12 percent earned a Grade ranging from 71.1 to 100

 

Sixth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand six hundred seventy-three students representing the graduating class of 2025; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.29. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 26 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 56.5

(3) Proficient Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.6 to 67.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 67.5 to 100

 

Sixth Grade Reading status

Of the 136,673 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 39 percent below grade level and 61 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 61 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 11 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Seventh Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-two thousand seven hundred ninety-six students representing the future graduating class of 2024; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 53.89. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 44.0

(2) Developing Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 44.2 to 54.5

(3) Proficient Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 54.7 to 66.1

(4) Distinguished Learner, 15 percent earned a Grade ranging from 66.3  to 100

 

Seventh Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand two hundred fifty-nine students representing the future graduating class of 2024; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.81. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.8

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.0 to 57.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.1 to 68.7

(4) Distinguished Learner, 8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.9 to 100

 

Seventh Grade Reading status

Of the 133,259 students assessed, GA DOE reported 25 percent below grade level and 75 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 75 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less the 8 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Eighth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred three thousand three hundred eighty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 48.54. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 41.5

(2) Developing Learner, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 41.7 to 51.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 52.1 to 63.1

(4) Distinguished Learner, 8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 63.3 to 100

 

Eighth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred twenty-four thousand seven hundred forty-five students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 58.22. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 20 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.3

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.5 to 59.21

(3) Proficient Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 59.4 to 70.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 12 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.5 to 100

 

Eighth Grade Reading status

Of the 124,745 students assessed, GA DOE reported 26 percent below grade level and 74 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 74 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 12 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Eighth Grade Social Studies

In 2019, One hundred thirty thousand one hundred eighty-two students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.89. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.3

(2) Developing Learner, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.5 to 59.8

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 60.0 to 69.7

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.9 to 100

 

Eighth Grade Science

In 2019, Ninety-four thousand seven hundred eighty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 53.87. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.8

(2) Developing Learner, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.0 to 57.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 25 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.1 to 68.9

(4) Distinguished Learner, 7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.0 to 100

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go and share. If you know anyone who may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

RESOURCES USED:

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 was another season of massive failure for Georgia’s students, as they progress through the Birth-to-High-school-Graduation years. As more than 80 percent failed to score better than a 70 on, Georgia’s Milestones Assessments of Elementary students. For the 7 to possibly 16 percent of passing students, Congratulations.

This is the first of three posts covering Georgia’s 2019 Milestones assessments; you can follow the links for the  Middle school Grades and High School Grades.

In this post, all Mean Grades were rounded to two decimal places. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges of grades are rounded to one decimal place.

 

Third Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand one hundred fifty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.63. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 44.3

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 44.6 to 56.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 39 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.6 to 69.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.9 to 100

 

Third Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand two hundred thirty-one students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 50.92. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 29 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 45.2

(2) Developing Learner, 29 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.4 to 52.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 53.1 to 61.5

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 61.7 to 100

 

Third Grade Reading status

Of the 129,231 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 14 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fourth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand four hundred eighty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.30. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.8

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 46.1 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 36 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.3 to 70.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.8 to 100

 

Fourth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand five hundred forty-seven students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.80. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 25 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 46.7

(2) Developing Learner, 32 percent earned a Grade ranging from 46.9 to 55.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 55.8 to 64.2

(4) Distinguished Learner, 16 percent earned a Grade ranging from 64.4 to 100

 

Fourth Grade Reading status

In 2019, Of the 133,547 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 36 percent below grade level and 64 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 64 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 16 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand four hundred fifty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.78. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.4

(2) Developing Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.7 to 56.3

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.5 to 68.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.5 to 100

 

Fifth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand five hundred thirteen students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.81. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 48.0

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 48.2 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 34 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.3 to 68.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.5 to 100

 

Fifth Grade Reading status

Of the 136,513 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 11 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Social Studies

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.87. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 47 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 62.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 19 percent earned a Grade ranging from 62.7 to 70.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.7 to 100

 

Fifth Grade Science

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.09. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 50.6

(2) Developing Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.8 to 58.7

(3) Proficient Learner, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.9 to 70.0

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.2 to 100

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go and share. If you know anyone who may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

SOURCES USED:

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

The Afterclap makes direct one-to-one conversions of SAT mean scaled scores to the easiest understood grading system used in America, the classroom grade from o to 100. Here, all scores are rounded to two decimal places to improve accuracy. And a grade of 70.00 and above is considered as the entry-level of preparedness for additional education and passing.

Reporting of the SAT initially focuses on three scores:

  1. Combined Mean Grade, which was a 54.83
  2. Math Mean Grade, which was a 53.17
  3. ERW (Evidence-Based Reading and Writing) Mean Grade, which was a 56.33

These scores are often followed by an attempt to show growth or the lack there of, by comparing two different groups of students. At The Afterclap, we consider each assessment a snapshot of the academic ability of a group of students on the day assessed. We hold it to be a logical fallacy to compare two alien groups to show growth or the lack of growth. However, we believe it is possible to contrast two different groups. We also believe the grades (results) are not a life sentence, nor are they a ticket to paradise.

The SAT provides score Distributions for Total Group, Math section, ERW section, Reading subsection, and Writing and Language subsection, Words in Context Subscores, Command of Evidence Subscores, and Expression of Ideas Subscores as shown in Table 1.1, through Table 1.8.

 

Table 1.1 2019 SAT Total Group Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 3,860 5.06
66.67 – 82.50 F, D, C, B 13,768 18.04
50.00   – 65.83 F 28,591 37.45
33.33 – 49.17 F 24,772 32.45
16.67 – 32.50 F 5,316 6.96
0 – 15.83 F 33 0.04

As Table 1.1 shows, more than 76.90 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

 

Table 1.2 2019 SAT Math section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 4,676 6.13
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 11,232 14.72
50.00 – 65.00 F 28,466 37.29
33.33 – 48.33 F 24,219 31.73
16.67 – 31.67 F 7,586 9.94
0.00 – 15.00 F 181 0.24

As Table 1.2 shows, more than 79.20 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Math section.

 

Table 1.3 2019 SAT ERW section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 4,427 5.80
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 17,487 22.91
50.00 – 65.00 F 27,466 35.98
33.33 – 48.33 F 22,320 29.24
16.67 – 31.67 F 4,585 6.00
0.00 – 15.00 F 55 0.07

As Table 1.3 shows, more than 71.29 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT ERW section.

 

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a reading subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean reading subsection grade was a 56.67

Table 1.4 2019 SAT Reading subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 5,135 6.73
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 19,041 24.94
50.00 – 65.00 F 28,324 37.10
33.33 – 48.33 F 19,759 25.88
16.67 – 31.67 F 3,977 5.21
0.00 – 15.00 F 86 0.11

As Table 1.4 shows, more than 68.30 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Reading subsection.

 

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a Writing and Language subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean Writing and Language subsection grade was a 56.67

Table 1.5 2019 SAT Writing and Language subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 5,487 7.19
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 17,855 23.39
50.00 – 65.00 F 24,884 32.60
33.33 – 48.33 F 22,355 29.28
16.67 – 31.67 F 5,592 7.33
0.00 – 15.00 F 167 0.22

As Table 1.5 shows, more than 69.43 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Writing and Language subsection.

 

Table 1.6 2019 SAT Words in Context Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 8,039 10.53
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 28,358 37.15
46.67 – 60.00 F 27,063 35.45
26.67 – 40.00 F 11,153 14.61
0.00 – 20.00 F 1,727 2.26

As Table 1.6 shows, more than 52.32 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Words in Context Subscores.

 

Table 1.7 2019 SAT Command of Evidence Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 8,531 11.18
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 23,069 30.22
46.67 – 60.00 F 31,993 41.91
26.67 – 40.00 F 12,454 16.31
0.00 – 20.00 F 293 0.38

As Table 1.7 shows, more than 58.60 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Command of Evidence Subscores.

 

Table 1.8 2019 SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 10,414 13.64
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 24,889 32.60
46.67 – 60.00 F 28,875 37.82
26.67 – 40.00 F 11,599 15.19
0.00 – 20.00 F 563 0.74

As Table 1.8 shows, more than 53.75 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores.

 

The worst part, self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go share. If you think anyone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

Resource link used:

[https://reports.collegeboard.org/pdf/2019-georgia-sat-suite-assessments-annual-report.pdf]

America Earns a “Big Fat F” on 2019 SAT

If America’s headlines 48-years ago in 1972 had read, “America Scores Another “F” on 1972 SAT, Now, Sixth Year in a Row,” maybe the results would be different today. The good news, a few students, did okay. But it is less than 20 percent.

 

The Afterclap makes a direct one-to-one value conversion of all of the different mean scaled scores to what is probably the most common and the most understood scale system used in America. The classroom numerical grade from o to 100. Here, all grades are rounded to two decimal places to improve accuracy. And a grade of 70.00 is considered as passing and the lowest level of preparedness for higher education. More about the methodology later.

Reporting of the SAT initially focuses on three scores:

  1. Combined Mean Grade, which was a 54.92
  2. Math Mean Grade, which was a 54.67
  3. ERW (Evidence-Based Reading and Writing) Mean Grade, which was a 55.17

They are followed by an attempt to show growth or the lack of growth by comparing two completely different groups of students against each other. As if the groups of students were competing against each other like sports teams. At The Afterclap, we consider each assessment a snapshot of the academic ability of a group of students on the day assessed. We also believe the grades are not a life sentence, nor are they a ticket to paradise.

The SAT also provides score Distributions for Total Group, Math section, ERW section, Reading subsection, and Writing and Language subsection, Words in Context Subscores, Command of Evidence Subscores, and Expression of Ideas Subscores as shown in Table 1.1, through Table 1.8.

Table 1.1 2019 SAT Total Group Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 154,485 6.95
66.67 – 82.50 F, D, C, B 431,780 19.45
50.00   – 65.83 F 736,076 33.15
33.33 – 49.17 F 655,005 29.50
16.67 – 32.50 F 237,303 10.69
0 – 15.83 F 5,447 0.25

As Table 1.1 shows, more than 73.59 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Table 1.2 2019 SAT Math section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 213,487 9.66
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 379,248 17.08
50.00 – 65.00 F 732,269 32.98
33.33 – 48.33 F 592,617 26.69
16.67 – 31.67 F 286,203 12.89
0.00 – 15.00 F 16,263 0.73

As Table 1.2 shows, more than 73.29 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Table 1.3 2019 SAT ERW section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 146,956 6.62
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 491,451 22.14
50.00 – 65.00 F 714,170 32.17
33.33 – 48.33 F 651,079 29.33
16.67 – 31.67 F 208,096 9.37
0.00 – 15.00 F 8,335 0.37

As Table 1.3 shows, more than 71.24 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a reading subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean reading subsection grade was a 56.66

Table 1.4 2019 SAT Reading subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 168,174 7.58
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 533,431 24.03
50.00 – 65.00 F 739,789 33.32
33.33 – 48.33 F 604,105 27.21
16.67 – 31.67 F 136,611 7.37
0.00 – 15.00 F 10,977 0.49

As Table 1.4 shows, more than 68.39 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the reading subsection.

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a Writing and Language subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean Writing and Language subsection grade was a 53.33

Table 1.5 2019 SAT Writing and Language subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students

83.33 – 100

B, A

172,930

7.79

66.67 – 81.67

F, D, C, B

498,915

22.47

50.00 – 65.00

F

663,459

29.88

33.33 – 48.33

F

634,781

28.59

16.67 – 31.67

F

235,701

10.62

0.00 – 15.00

F

14,301

0.64

As Table 1.5 shows, more than 69.73 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Writing and Language subsection.

Table 1.6 2019 SAT Words in Context Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 247,896 11.17
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 785,852 35.40
46.67 – 60.00 F 737,732 33.23
26.67 – 40.00 F 343,915 15.49
0.00 – 20.00 F 104,692 4.72

As Table 1.6 shows, more than 53.44 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Words in Context Subscores.

Table 1.7 2019 SAT Command of Evidence Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 266,421 12.00
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 638,008 28.74
46.67 – 60.00 F 868,699 39.13
26.67 – 40.00 F 431,099 19.42
0.00 – 20.00 F 15,860 0.71

As Table 1.7 shows, more than 59.26 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Command of Evidence Subscores.

Table 1.8 2019 SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 317,308 14.29
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 671,368 30.24
46.67 – 60.00 F 777,046 35.00
26.67 – 40.00 F 414,785 18.68
0.00 – 20.00 F 39,580 1.78

As Table 1.8 shows, more than 55.46 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Expression of Ideas Subscores.

The worst part, self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go share. If you think anyone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

Revised: 2019 1008 0659

Resource link used:

[https://reports.collegeboard.org/pdf/2019-total-group-sat-suite-assessments-annual-report.pdf]

 

Before Reading an Analysis by The Afterclap

It is not unreasonable to question any form of media or the intention of published information. The Afterclap holds that questioning can be healthy, and is an indication of a thinking and inquisitive person, and welcomes your questions.

 

Analysis Methodology 

  1. The analysis prepared by The Afterclap show traditionally reported statistical data (scale scores) as grades.
  2. All grades range from 0 to 100, rounded to a single decimal place.
  3. The Afterclap has one Benchmark, a grade of 70 or better. Where 70 is the entry-level grade for a basic or better, depth of academic knowledge.
  4. The Afterclap logically considers each Graduating class or Cohort to be a separate specific entity of its own. So unique metaphorically, as to be one of a kind new species. Therefore, it does not compare different Graduating classes or Cohorts as a general rule.

 

Why a Grade

The Afterclap uses a grading scale of 0 to 100 because it may be the most commonly understood scale used in the last century.

We also use this scale because we believe that education authorities have broken the most basic core principle of teaching, by using unfamiliar scales without a logical presentation of information that allows the necessary academic growth and functional understanding of the new scales.

The most basic core principle of teaching is: You start teaching a student from where the student’s, “Depth of Knowledge (is or) Stands.” And from that known-place, the teacher takes the student to the next logical-place for academic growth. In effect, making the new-logical-place, the new known-place. This cycle should start shortly after birth, and continue through high school graduation.*

The grades are a step back to what should be a known-place. Where there should be a reasonable depth of comprehension and understanding by all stakeholders.

 

Why the analysis may be discomforting

When presented information using a different point-of-view (POV), it is not unreasonable to:

  1. Be skeptical,
  2. Feel uncomfortable,
  3. Feel threatened if the POV pushes against their comfort zone, or
  4. Question the information if the results seem to be magical mathematics.

As to the math, embarrassingly, the mathematics should not be beyond the expected capabilities of a Sixth Grader by the end of the school year. As to the Mathematical thinking level involved, I do not know the answer.

 

During the process of writing this post, the 1895 quote by Leonard H. Courtney, (1832-1918) came to mind:

“…After all, facts are facts, and although we may quote one to another with a chuckle the words of the Wise Statesman, “Lies – damn lies – and statistics,” still there are some easy figures the simplest must understand, and the astutest cannot wriggle out of.”

 

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go. If you suspect someone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

 

* The Afterclap is currently focused on the birth through high school graduation years. However, it is a strong held OPINION:

  1. Before a student graduates from high school, they should be able to continue the cycle described by teaching themselves for the rest of their lives.
  2. Able to teach the basic level of skills of how-to-learn and how to teach-themselves to their children.
  3. And none of this restricts the choice to continue their education beyond high school for the rest of their lives.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Resource links used:

phrases, sayings, proverbs and idioms at The Phrase Finder [https://www.phrases.org.uk/index.html], and [https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/lies-damned-lies-and-statistics.html]

Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics – University of York –  [https://www.york.ac.uk/depts/maths/histstat/lies.htm]