2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 was an unkind season of excessive failure for Georgia’s Middle School students, as they traveled forward through the Birth-to-High-school-Graduation years. As more than 80 percent failed to score better than a 70 on, Georgia’s Milestones Assessments of Middle school students. For the 7 to possibly 15 percent of passing students, Congratulations.

This is the second of three posts covering Georgia’s 2019 Milestones assessments; you can follow the links for the Elementary Grades and High School Grades

In this post, Mean Grades are rounded to two decimal places. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges of grades are rounded to one decimal place.

 

Sixth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand six hundred twenty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2025; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.90. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.5

(2) Developing Learner, 39 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.8 to 57.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.8 to 70.8

(4) Distinguished Learner, 12 percent earned a Grade ranging from 71.1 to 100

 

Sixth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand six hundred seventy-three students representing the graduating class of 2025; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.29. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 26 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 56.5

(3) Proficient Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.6 to 67.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 67.5 to 100

 

Sixth Grade Reading status

Of the 136,673 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 39 percent below grade level and 61 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 61 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 11 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Seventh Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-two thousand seven hundred ninety-six students representing the future graduating class of 2024; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 53.89. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 44.0

(2) Developing Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 44.2 to 54.5

(3) Proficient Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 54.7 to 66.1

(4) Distinguished Learner, 15 percent earned a Grade ranging from 66.3  to 100

 

Seventh Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand two hundred fifty-nine students representing the future graduating class of 2024; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.81. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.8

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.0 to 57.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.1 to 68.7

(4) Distinguished Learner, 8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.9 to 100

 

Seventh Grade Reading status

Of the 133,259 students assessed, GA DOE reported 25 percent below grade level and 75 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 75 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less the 8 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Eighth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred three thousand three hundred eighty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 48.54. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 41.5

(2) Developing Learner, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 41.7 to 51.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 52.1 to 63.1

(4) Distinguished Learner, 8 percent earned a Grade ranging from 63.3 to 100

 

Eighth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred twenty-four thousand seven hundred forty-five students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 58.22. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 20 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.3

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.5 to 59.21

(3) Proficient Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 59.4 to 70.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 12 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.5 to 100

 

Eighth Grade Reading status

Of the 124,745 students assessed, GA DOE reported 26 percent below grade level and 74 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 74 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 12 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Eighth Grade Social Studies

In 2019, One hundred thirty thousand one hundred eighty-two students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.89. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.3

(2) Developing Learner, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.5 to 59.8

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 60.0 to 69.7

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.9 to 100

 

Eighth Grade Science

In 2019, Ninety-four thousand seven hundred eighty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2023; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 53.87. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 38 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.8

(2) Developing Learner, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.0 to 57.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 25 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.1 to 68.9

(4) Distinguished Learner, 7 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.0 to 100

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go and share. If you know anyone who may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

RESOURCES USED:

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

2019 Georgia Milestones Elementary Scores as Grades

2019 was another season of massive failure for Georgia’s students, as they progress through the Birth-to-High-school-Graduation years. As more than 80 percent failed to score better than a 70 on, Georgia’s Milestones Assessments of Elementary students. For the 7 to possibly 16 percent of passing students, Congratulations.

This is the first of three posts covering Georgia’s 2019 Milestones assessments; you can follow the links for the  Middle school Grades and High School Grades.

In this post, all Mean Grades were rounded to two decimal places. Learning levels (1) Beginning Learner, (2) Developing Learner, (3) Proficient Learner, and (4) Distinguished Learner ranges of grades are rounded to one decimal place.

 

Third Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand one hundred fifty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 56.63. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 44.3

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 44.6 to 56.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 39 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.6 to 69.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 69.9 to 100

 

Third Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred twenty-nine thousand two hundred thirty-one students representing the future graduating class of 2028; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 50.92. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 29 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0.0 to 45.2

(2) Developing Learner, 29 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.4 to 52.9

(3) Proficient Learner, 28 percent earned a Grade ranging from 53.1 to 61.5

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 61.7 to 100

 

Third Grade Reading status

Of the 129,231 students assessed, the Georgia Department of Education (GA DOE) reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 14 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fourth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand four hundred eighty-six students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.30. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 18 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.8

(2) Developing Learner, 33 percent earned a Grade ranging from 46.1 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 36 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.3 to 70.6

(4) Distinguished Learner, 14 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.8 to 100

 

Fourth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-three thousand five hundred forty-seven students representing the future graduating class of 2027; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.80. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 25 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 46.7

(2) Developing Learner, 32 percent earned a Grade ranging from 46.9 to 55.6

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 55.8 to 64.2

(4) Distinguished Learner, 16 percent earned a Grade ranging from 64.4 to 100

 

Fourth Grade Reading status

In 2019, Of the 133,547 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 36 percent below grade level and 64 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 64 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 16 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Mathematics

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand four hundred fifty-eight students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.78. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 45.4

(2) Developing Learner, 35 percent earned a Grade ranging from 45.7 to 56.3

(3) Proficient Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 56.5 to 68.3

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.5 to 100

 

Fifth Grade English Language Arts

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand five hundred thirteen students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 55.81. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 24 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 48.0

(2) Developing Learner, 31 percent earned a Grade ranging from 48.2 to 57.1

(3) Proficient Learner, 34 percent earned a Grade ranging from 57.3 to 68.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 68.5 to 100

 

Fifth Grade Reading status

Of the 136,513 students assessed, the GA DOE reported 27 percent below grade level and 73 percent at or above grade level.

Which raises the question, how is it possible that 73 percent of the students were reading at or above grade level when less than 11 percent of the Grades earned were above a 70?

 

Fifth Grade Social Studies

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.87. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 22 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 49.1

(2) Developing Learner, 47 percent earned a Grade ranging from 49.3 to 62.4

(3) Proficient Learner, 19 percent earned a Grade ranging from 62.7 to 70.4

(4) Distinguished Learner, 11 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.7 to 100

 

Fifth Grade Science

In 2019, One hundred thirty-six thousand two hundred seven students representing the future graduating class of 2026; were assessed. Their Mean Grade was a 57.09. Their Distribution of Grades across the four learning levels:

(1) Beginning Learner range, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 0 to 50.6

(2) Developing Learner, 27 percent earned a Grade ranging from 50.8 to 58.7

(3) Proficient Learner, 30 percent earned a Grade ranging from 58.9 to 70.0

(4) Distinguished Learner, 13 percent earned a Grade ranging from 70.2 to 100

 

The obligatory self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go and share. If you know anyone who may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Related:

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

2019 Georgia Milestones Middle School Scores as Grades

2019 Georgia Milestones High School Scores as Grades

 

SOURCES USED:

[https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Documents/Spring%202019%20EOG%20-%20State%20Level%20-%20All%20Grades.xlsx]

Georgia Milestones Assessment System End-of-Grade (EOG) Interpretive Guide for Score Reports for Spring and Summer 2019 For Use with Score Reports from Spring and Summer 2019 Administrations.Pdf

Georgia Scores an F on 2019 SAT

The Afterclap makes direct one-to-one conversions of SAT mean scaled scores to the easiest understood grading system used in America, the classroom grade from o to 100. Here, all scores are rounded to two decimal places to improve accuracy. And a grade of 70.00 and above is considered as the entry-level of preparedness for additional education and passing.

Reporting of the SAT initially focuses on three scores:

  1. Combined Mean Grade, which was a 54.83
  2. Math Mean Grade, which was a 53.17
  3. ERW (Evidence-Based Reading and Writing) Mean Grade, which was a 56.33

These scores are often followed by an attempt to show growth or the lack there of, by comparing two different groups of students. At The Afterclap, we consider each assessment a snapshot of the academic ability of a group of students on the day assessed. We hold it to be a logical fallacy to compare two alien groups to show growth or the lack of growth. However, we believe it is possible to contrast two different groups. We also believe the grades (results) are not a life sentence, nor are they a ticket to paradise.

The SAT provides score Distributions for Total Group, Math section, ERW section, Reading subsection, and Writing and Language subsection, Words in Context Subscores, Command of Evidence Subscores, and Expression of Ideas Subscores as shown in Table 1.1, through Table 1.8.

 

Table 1.1 2019 SAT Total Group Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 3,860 5.06
66.67 – 82.50 F, D, C, B 13,768 18.04
50.00   – 65.83 F 28,591 37.45
33.33 – 49.17 F 24,772 32.45
16.67 – 32.50 F 5,316 6.96
0 – 15.83 F 33 0.04

As Table 1.1 shows, more than 76.90 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

 

Table 1.2 2019 SAT Math section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 4,676 6.13
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 11,232 14.72
50.00 – 65.00 F 28,466 37.29
33.33 – 48.33 F 24,219 31.73
16.67 – 31.67 F 7,586 9.94
0.00 – 15.00 F 181 0.24

As Table 1.2 shows, more than 79.20 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Math section.

 

Table 1.3 2019 SAT ERW section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 4,427 5.80
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 17,487 22.91
50.00 – 65.00 F 27,466 35.98
33.33 – 48.33 F 22,320 29.24
16.67 – 31.67 F 4,585 6.00
0.00 – 15.00 F 55 0.07

As Table 1.3 shows, more than 71.29 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT ERW section.

 

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a reading subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean reading subsection grade was a 56.67

Table 1.4 2019 SAT Reading subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 5,135 6.73
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 19,041 24.94
50.00 – 65.00 F 28,324 37.10
33.33 – 48.33 F 19,759 25.88
16.67 – 31.67 F 3,977 5.21
0.00 – 15.00 F 86 0.11

As Table 1.4 shows, more than 68.30 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Reading subsection.

 

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a Writing and Language subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean Writing and Language subsection grade was a 56.67

Table 1.5 2019 SAT Writing and Language subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 5,487 7.19
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 17,855 23.39
50.00 – 65.00 F 24,884 32.60
33.33 – 48.33 F 22,355 29.28
16.67 – 31.67 F 5,592 7.33
0.00 – 15.00 F 167 0.22

As Table 1.5 shows, more than 69.43 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Writing and Language subsection.

 

Table 1.6 2019 SAT Words in Context Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 8,039 10.53
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 28,358 37.15
46.67 – 60.00 F 27,063 35.45
26.67 – 40.00 F 11,153 14.61
0.00 – 20.00 F 1,727 2.26

As Table 1.6 shows, more than 52.32 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Words in Context Subscores.

 

Table 1.7 2019 SAT Command of Evidence Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 8,531 11.18
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 23,069 30.22
46.67 – 60.00 F 31,993 41.91
26.67 – 40.00 F 12,454 16.31
0.00 – 20.00 F 293 0.38

As Table 1.7 shows, more than 58.60 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Command of Evidence Subscores.

 

Table 1.8 2019 SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 10,414 13.64
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 24,889 32.60
46.67 – 60.00 F 28,875 37.82
26.67 – 40.00 F 11,599 15.19
0.00 – 20.00 F 563 0.74

As Table 1.8 shows, more than 53.75 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores.

 

The worst part, self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go share. If you think anyone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

Resource link used:

[https://reports.collegeboard.org/pdf/2019-georgia-sat-suite-assessments-annual-report.pdf]

America Earns a “Big Fat F” on 2019 SAT

If America’s headlines 48-years ago in 1972 had read, “America Scores Another “F” on 1972 SAT, Now, Sixth Year in a Row,” maybe the results would be different today. The good news, a few students, did okay. But it is less than 20 percent.

 

The Afterclap makes a direct one-to-one value conversion of all of the different mean scaled scores to what is probably the most common and the most understood scale system used in America. The classroom numerical grade from o to 100. Here, all grades are rounded to two decimal places to improve accuracy. And a grade of 70.00 is considered as passing and the lowest level of preparedness for higher education. More about the methodology later.

Reporting of the SAT initially focuses on three scores:

  1. Combined Mean Grade, which was a 54.92
  2. Math Mean Grade, which was a 54.67
  3. ERW (Evidence-Based Reading and Writing) Mean Grade, which was a 55.17

They are followed by an attempt to show growth or the lack of growth by comparing two completely different groups of students against each other. As if the groups of students were competing against each other like sports teams. At The Afterclap, we consider each assessment a snapshot of the academic ability of a group of students on the day assessed. We also believe the grades are not a life sentence, nor are they a ticket to paradise.

The SAT also provides score Distributions for Total Group, Math section, ERW section, Reading subsection, and Writing and Language subsection, Words in Context Subscores, Command of Evidence Subscores, and Expression of Ideas Subscores as shown in Table 1.1, through Table 1.8.

Table 1.1 2019 SAT Total Group Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 154,485 6.95
66.67 – 82.50 F, D, C, B 431,780 19.45
50.00   – 65.83 F 736,076 33.15
33.33 – 49.17 F 655,005 29.50
16.67 – 32.50 F 237,303 10.69
0 – 15.83 F 5,447 0.25

As Table 1.1 shows, more than 73.59 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Table 1.2 2019 SAT Math section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 213,487 9.66
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 379,248 17.08
50.00 – 65.00 F 732,269 32.98
33.33 – 48.33 F 592,617 26.69
16.67 – 31.67 F 286,203 12.89
0.00 – 15.00 F 16,263 0.73

As Table 1.2 shows, more than 73.29 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Table 1.3 2019 SAT ERW section Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 146,956 6.62
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 491,451 22.14
50.00 – 65.00 F 714,170 32.17
33.33 – 48.33 F 651,079 29.33
16.67 – 31.67 F 208,096 9.37
0.00 – 15.00 F 8,335 0.37

As Table 1.3 shows, more than 71.24 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the SAT.

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a reading subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean reading subsection grade was a 56.66

Table 1.4 2019 SAT Reading subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
83.33 – 100 B, A 168,174 7.58
66.67 – 81.67 F, D, C, B 533,431 24.03
50.00 – 65.00 F 739,789 33.32
33.33 – 48.33 F 604,105 27.21
16.67 – 31.67 F 136,611 7.37
0.00 – 15.00 F 10,977 0.49

As Table 1.4 shows, more than 68.39 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the reading subsection.

Also, starting in 2017, the SAT included a Writing and Language subsection score. For 2019 SAT, the mean Writing and Language subsection grade was a 53.33

Table 1.5 2019 SAT Writing and Language subsection Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution   Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students

83.33 – 100

B, A

172,930

7.79

66.67 – 81.67

F, D, C, B

498,915

22.47

50.00 – 65.00

F

663,459

29.88

33.33 – 48.33

F

634,781

28.59

16.67 – 31.67

F

235,701

10.62

0.00 – 15.00

F

14,301

0.64

As Table 1.5 shows, more than 69.73 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Writing and Language subsection.

Table 1.6 2019 SAT Words in Context Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 247,896 11.17
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 785,852 35.40
46.67 – 60.00 F 737,732 33.23
26.67 – 40.00 F 343,915 15.49
0.00 – 20.00 F 104,692 4.72

As Table 1.6 shows, more than 53.44 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Words in Context Subscores.

Table 1.7 2019 SAT Command of Evidence Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 266,421 12.00
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 638,008 28.74
46.67 – 60.00 F 868,699 39.13
26.67 – 40.00 F 431,099 19.42
0.00 – 20.00 F 15,860 0.71

As Table 1.7 shows, more than 59.26 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Command of Evidence Subscores.

Table 1.8 2019 SAT Expression of Ideas Subscores Distribution by, Grade, Letter grade, Number of students tested, and by Percent of students

Grade Distribution  Letter Grade Distribution Number of students tested Percent of students
86.67 – 100 B, A 317,308 14.29
66.67 – 80.00 F, D, C, B 671,368 30.24
46.67 – 60.00 F 777,046 35.00
26.67 – 40.00 F 414,785 18.68
0.00 – 20.00 F 39,580 1.78

As Table 1.8 shows, more than 55.46 percent of the students failed to make a 70 or better on the Expression of Ideas Subscores.

The worst part, self-promotion:

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow, and share. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go share. If you think anyone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

Revised: 2019 1008 0659

Resource link used:

[https://reports.collegeboard.org/pdf/2019-total-group-sat-suite-assessments-annual-report.pdf]

 

Before Reading an Analysis by The Afterclap

It is not unreasonable to question any form of media or the intention of published information. The Afterclap holds that questioning can be healthy, and is an indication of a thinking and inquisitive person, and welcomes your questions.

 

Analysis Methodology 

  1. The analysis prepared by The Afterclap show traditionally reported statistical data (scale scores) as grades.
  2. All grades range from 0 to 100, rounded to a single decimal place.
  3. The Afterclap has one Benchmark, a grade of 70 or better. Where 70 is the entry-level grade for a basic or better, depth of academic knowledge.
  4. The Afterclap logically considers each Graduating class or Cohort to be a separate specific entity of its own. So unique metaphorically, as to be one of a kind new species. Therefore, it does not compare different Graduating classes or Cohorts as a general rule.

 

Why a Grade

The Afterclap uses a grading scale of 0 to 100 because it may be the most commonly understood scale used in the last century.

We also use this scale because we believe that education authorities have broken the most basic core principle of teaching, by using unfamiliar scales without a logical presentation of information that allows the necessary academic growth and functional understanding of the new scales.

The most basic core principle of teaching is: You start teaching a student from where the student’s, “Depth of Knowledge (is or) Stands.” And from that known-place, the teacher takes the student to the next logical-place for academic growth. In effect, making the new-logical-place, the new known-place. This cycle should start shortly after birth, and continue through high school graduation.*

The grades are a step back to what should be a known-place. Where there should be a reasonable depth of comprehension and understanding by all stakeholders.

 

Why the analysis may be discomforting

When presented information using a different point-of-view (POV), it is not unreasonable to:

  1. Be skeptical,
  2. Feel uncomfortable,
  3. Feel threatened if the POV pushes against their comfort zone, or
  4. Question the information if the results seem to be magical mathematics.

As to the math, embarrassingly, the mathematics should not be beyond the expected capabilities of a Sixth Grader by the end of the school year. As to the Mathematical thinking level involved, I do not know the answer.

 

During the process of writing this post, the 1895 quote by Leonard H. Courtney, (1832-1918) came to mind:

“…After all, facts are facts, and although we may quote one to another with a chuckle the words of the Wise Statesman, “Lies – damn lies – and statistics,” still there are some easy figures the simplest must understand, and the astutest cannot wriggle out of.”

 

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go. If you suspect someone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

 

* The Afterclap is currently focused on the birth through high school graduation years. However, it is a strong held OPINION:

  1. Before a student graduates from high school, they should be able to continue the cycle described by teaching themselves for the rest of their lives.
  2. Able to teach the basic level of skills of how-to-learn and how to teach-themselves to their children.
  3. And none of this restricts the choice to continue their education beyond high school for the rest of their lives.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Blog

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

 

Resource links used:

phrases, sayings, proverbs and idioms at The Phrase Finder [https://www.phrases.org.uk/index.html], and [https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/lies-damned-lies-and-statistics.html]

Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics – University of York –  [https://www.york.ac.uk/depts/maths/histstat/lies.htm]

Why The Afterclap

The story begins more than six decades earlier, but the first recent-inciting event was the abrupt death of the first person I loved more than myself in 2004, my wife. The phone call, yes, the phone call came just after dropping our seven-year-old autistic son off at day camp. And a little after 8 a.m. I became the single parent dad to an autistic son.

Elaine was always involved with the schools as a volunteer. And when available, I tagged along and did what I could do to support her. Unavailable was performing my assigned duty in the U.S. Army. But by the time Number-one-son was born, my military status was; U.S. Army, Infantryman, Retired.

The second inciting event occurred in 2005 when an elementary school principal asked if I would run for the school council. Wanting to be involved where I could, I ran and held a position on a school council, from the Fall of 2005, through the spring of 2014 consecutively in an Elementary, Middle and a High school. And held the chair position in Middle school and three-years in high school.

In Georgia, the A+ Education Reform Act of 2000 required a school council established at every public school by October 1, 2003. And two laws established and set the requirements for school councils:

(1) O.C.G.A. § 20-2-85 – Establishment of school councils

(2) O.C.G.A. § 20-2-85 – 86 – Requirements of school councils

Georgia O.C.G.A. § 20-2-85 – 86 – (k) listed six specific requirements required from its members:

(1) Maintain a school-wide perspective on issues;

(2) Regularly participate in council meetings;

(3) Participate in information and training programs;

(4) Act as a link between the school council and the community;

(5) Encourage the participation of parents and others within the school community; and

(6) Work to improve student achievement and performance

Items one through five were not impossible to accomplish. However, item six requires you to understand student achievement and performance. It was the scaled scores without an easily discernible meaning that prohibited understanding where we were, and any accomplishments. Thereby opening the door for education authorities to tell you what it meant. And when asked what it meant, they used vague statements like:

> Did not meet the standards,

> Meet the standards, or

> Exceeded the standards.

But they could not, or would not explain the assessment standards.

Not satisfied with a non-answer-answer, I studied the data and decoded the scaling. And in the process, I learned there are two basic kinds of standards.

One is the standards that explain (or maybe a better word specifies) what a student is supposed to learn in a discipline, in a logical or progressive order. And if you are a teacher, or someone who has a depth of knowledge about this kind of a standard, the explanation was untechnified to the best of my current ability.

Two, the scale scores to be shown as numerical-grades by The Afterclap, which are the test results; and the various standards showing what education authorities want you to believe is an appropriate measurement of student success.

At the Afterclap, everything is converted to a numerical-grade using what we believe is both the most common scale and the one best understood. Zero to one-hundred, where 70 to 100 is considered as basic to adequately understanding the material assessed in an academic environment. There will be no A, B, C, D, or F’s, nor will there be any 1, 2, 3, or 4’s.

Why the word, Afterclap?

I saw the word “afterclap” for the first time in a Haggard Hawks Facebook post,  yet, it was the modern interpretations that were the most intriguing:

Collins dictionary noun, an unexpected aftereffect

Dictionary dot com noun, an unexpected repercussion

Merriam-Webster noun, an unexpected damaging or unsettling event following a supposedly closed affair

Based on continuing research, and the dictionary definitions, I derived the focus of this blog:

“The unexpected repercussions or consequences of the birth through high school graduation years, as measured by student assessments.”

While The Afterclap uses test outcomes, we acknowledge that assessments are not without flaws. And suspect there is no single perfect assessment for any group of students, including a test written by a teacher for students in their class. However, beyond the common issues of poorly worded questions, and questions that are not appropriate for many reasons; the primary concern at the Afterclap is the level of literacy skills, and the depth of cultural knowledge required of students to best demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter assessed.

If you decide to hang around for the next post, The Afterclap is going to explore the United States 2019’s Senior Cohort high school Class, SAT scores, followed with the state results. Where you will be shown results in a way, you are unlikely to have ever seen before, including results not normally reported by the media.

If you find this informative, different, or potentially interesting, follow. If you think I am an idiot, follow, to see how far down the rabbit hole I go. If you think anyone you know may be interested, for any of the previously stated reasons, share. Or not.

 

You can find The Afterclap at:

Web page

Facebook

Or when we Twitter @TAfterclap

Links used:

[https://www.facebook.com/haggardhawks/]

[https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/dictionary/english/afterclap]

[https://www.dictionary.com/browse/afterclap]

[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/afterclap]